Lifestyle and Mind Medical Specialties Neurology News Positivity Therapies

Table Tennis Can Help Parkinson’s Sufferers Fight the Disease

The benefits of the low-impact sport, such as improved hand-eye coordination and concentration, are well known, but new research shows table tennis (also called ping-pong) can also slow the progress of Parkinson’s disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disease for which there is no cure.

More than 10 million people worldwide are living with Parkinson’s disease, according to the Parkinson’s Foundation.

In China it is thought to affect at least 1.7 million people. Scientists estimate this will rise to almost five million by 2030, by which time China will account for almost half of the world Parkinson’s disease population.

Table tennis has been shown to help the elderly battle Parkinson’s disease, as well as being a great way to keep fit.

Whether played for fun or in serious competition, table tennis is popular with many people around the globe. In Victorian England, it was a fun after-dinner activity for the upper classes, and today in China, table tennis is the national sport played by millions.

The benefits of the low-impact sport, such as improved hand-eye coordination and concentration, are well known, but new research shows table tennis (also called ping-pong) can also slow the progress of Parkinson’s disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disease for which there is no cure.

More than 10 million people worldwide are living with Parkinson’s disease, according to the Parkinson’s Foundation.

In China it is thought to affect at least 1.7 million people. Scientists estimate this will rise to almost five million by 2030, by which time China will account for almost half of the world Parkinson’s disease population.

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with no cure. Photo: Shutterstock

The study, conducted by researchers at Japan’s Fukuoka University, found that playing table tennis can help reduce tremors, limb rigidity, and slowness of movement, and improve balance.

Patients are currently treated with drugs to relieve the symptoms of stiffness and poor muscle control, but medication can cause nausea and hallucinations.Other research into the disease also suggests that regular exercise such as yoga, running and non-contact boxing can improve the quality of life of patients in the early stages of Parkinson’s.A three-year study released by the Hong Kong Parkinson’s Disease Foundation in 2014, found that five sessions of physical training a week improved balance by 15 per cent. It also showed an 18 per cent improvement in the ability to walk while talking, something that is difficult for patients with the disease.

Now researchers in Japan have added table tennis to the list of beneficial activities.

Read More

Meeta Ramnani
Meeta Ramnani
Meeta develops credible content about various markets based on deep research, opinions from experts and inputs from industry leaders. As the managing editor at Smart Industry News, she assures that every piece of news and article adds to the knowledge of decision makers. An avid bike rider, Meeta, is a postgraduate from Indian Institute of Journalism and New Media (IIJNM) Bangalore, where her specialization was Business Journalism. She carries experience from mainstream print media including The Times Group and Sakal Media Group.
https://smarthealthcarenews.com/